The King of Profit Review Ricky Hudson

The King of Profit is a new horse racing tipster service which is operated by Ricky Hudson. He claims to have produced some astonishing profits in a vert small period of time.

Introduction to The King of Profit 

If Ricky Hudson is in a position to deliver on an of his claims, then The King of Profit is truly a well titled service. There is talk in the headlines of generating an income that significantly exceeds five figures a month, a kingly sum indeed.

Truth be told though, there isn’t a significant amount of information provided which suggests that these claims are actually viable or in fact, provable. This makes for a massive hurdle as far as The King of Profit goes and as such, I will be taking a cynical view into this review.

None the less, the ability to make the income figures claimed would be huge, so with all of this in mind, let’s see whether or not Ricky Hudson can really deliver.  

the-king-of-profit-reviewWhat Does The King of Profit Offer?

There is a lot to unpackage with The King of Profit, mostly down to the way that Ricky Hudson presents himself, but I will come to this later. The fact of the matter is that what you are actually getting is a relatively straight forward tipster service.

Don’t get me wrong, there is some pomp behind The King of Profit but what you are fundamentally getting is tips delivered directly to your inbox via email. These do however arrive the evening before racing, something that does make Ricky Hudson stand out a little (although I am not convinced as to how much this really effects the results).

I have mentioned the fact that there are some unconventional elements to The King of Profit and this extends to the bets themselves. There are a range of different bets that are advised which are made up of various different accumulators.

In fact, based off the little evidence that Ricky Hudson actually bothers to provide for the service, you would believe these will be received exclusively. Typically with quite long odds. This approach does have the effect of not yielding a particularly large number of selections, however as I want to explore, this may ultimately prove to be to your benefit.

In terms of a staking plan, there is seemingly something happening as you don’t bet to level stakes with The King of Profit. Unfortunately, if there is any kind of “plan” in place, I am quite unable to discern it.

The majority of bets seem to be advised at 1-2.5 points on a given bet. Fortunately, the low volume of bets means that the risk involved with The King of Profit sort of manages itself, however, and this is a big however, you also have to factor in the strike rate for bets. Low volume and moderate stakes can still add up if you aren’t winning often and honestly, Ricky Hudson does little to demonstrate that this can be expected.

All of this ties in to the strike rate or more realistically, the lack thereof. The fact of the matter is that Ricky Hudson doesn’t ever really address how often you can expect to win with The King of Profit. I think that the closest you get to a statement is where he says “When it comes to betting there is one truth that you need to understand.

You will lose more days than you win. I don’t care what method you follow, the losing days will always outweigh the winning ones. My approach included!”. There are no numbers discussed though and proofing for The King of Profit is none existent outside of a few highly questionable screenshots.

How Does The King of Profit Work?

The lack of information continues to be problematic when you look at how The King of Profit actually works. This is because Ricky Hudson doesn’t actually say anything. Ever. He picks a horse because he thinks it will win.

Fantastic. Bags of information there Ricky Hudson…... The fact of the matter is that because of the kind of odds and the bets that The King of Profit utilises, I don’t believe that it is unreasonable to request some insight into why those horses are being picked outside of the fact that somebody with no real credentials (outside of some questionable screenshots) fancies their chances.

Outside of this, about the only other insight that I can offer is both blatantly obvious and somewhat concerning. Betting on outsiders is a valid betting approach. Longer odds mean that you don’t have to win as often and when you do win, quids in! Tying back to my initial point though, this only works with careful bank management and a genuine system in place. Given that The King of Profit comes with none of this and no proofing, it is definitely concerning to me.

What is the Initial Investment?

Ricky Hudson has chosen to make The King of Profit a pay as you win betting system, something that I believe is a bit of a double edged sword (but I will come back to this later). There are three different options available, each of which buys you more winning bets for less.

First of all, you can pay £50 (plus VAT) in order to receive 5 winning bets. Alternatively, you can pay £79 (plus VAT) to receive 10 winning bets. Finally, you can pay £100 (plus VAT) in order to receive 20 winning bets.

It is worth noting that Ricky Hudson is selling The King of Profit through Clickbank which means that there is a full 60 day money back guarantee in place for the product. Rather unfortunately, this isn’t mentioned anywhere in the sales material for the service.

What is the Rate of Return?

In order for a bet to be considered a “wining bet”, it has to generate a return of at least £100. This means that feasibly, the least you could earn on a subscription is £250 (based off hypothetical maximum stakes of £50). The fact of the matter though is that you can seemingly expect significantly more than this.

In fact, Ricky Hudson claims that in February, he made more than £20,000 from his accumulators. Naturally, we shouldn’t expect this every month Ricky Hudson says, as this was bolstered by a winning bet of some £18,000. However, March is already shaping up with a bet returning £5,419 off a £20 stake. These numbers are not convincing though and have little evidence backing them up.

Conclusion on The King of Profit 

I have seen a lot of hugely questionable tipster services in my time, but The King of Profit is one of the more obvious examples that I have ever seen. There are just so many elements that simply don’t quite add up, or come with any evidence at all, if I’m frank. All of this is a huge concern to me for a number of reasons, not least of which is because actually, Ricky Hudson is asking quite a lot for the service in my opinion.

Here’s the thing, I can appreciate that when you sign up to The King of Profit, you are only paying when you win, but you have to pay out in order to receive selections in that first instance. If a tipster service is genuine, this isn’t a problem, but what if you have doubts about the authenticity as I do here? For me, it creates a lot of issues surrounding risk, a point that I want to talk about in detail shortly.

Honestly, I would love nothing more than for The King of Profit to be a genuine product. I would love to see £20,000 per month being a viable option, and if it were, this would be a bargain. The problem lies in the fact that as mentioned, there is no tangible or credible evidence in my opinion that this will genuinely work.

And so we come to the risk aspect. First things first, the fact that there is a full money back guarantee does go some way to alleviating this, but the big question for me is how long you can reasonably expect to wait before you encounter wins. The nature of The King of Profit means that you won’t win often.

Ricky Hudson even goes out of his way to tell you this. So, it isn’t unfeasible that you might not necessarily win 5 times in that 60 day period. With proofing or evidence of a strike rate, this may be different, but as discussed, none of this is available.

With all of this in mind, I honestly can’t bring myself to recommend The King of Profit at all. The whole thing feels like an exercise in marketing and as an example of this, I can see merit.

As a tipster service though, I don’t believe that Ricky Hudson is even close to delivering what he claims. I am of the opinion that The King of Profit will ultimately just serve as a cash drain and I can easily see it eating up a betting bank. This is definitely one to avoid.  

Comments (1)

Does anyone know if this service is sill live – I have not had any contact from them since late May and my emails go unanswered ? – although the website is still live -over 200 points down in twelve week by the way – I would recommend a 400 point bank………

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From: Simon Roberts