The Sequence Multiplier Review Paul Peters

The Sequence Multiplier is a horse racing service which has been created by Paul Peters. He claims that his approach to betting is able to produce some very substantial profits for his subscribers.

Introduction to The Sequence Multiplier

It’s been a while sine I’ve seen something quite like The Sequence Multiplier. That is to say, a service that is so monumentally insane in the claims that are made, with so little to back them up. I’ve only glanced over the sales material as I’m writing this introduction and I can already tell you that this will be a fun thing to write about, for all the wrong reasons.

Whether or not it will work as a very different question, but I will get to that a little later. But here’s the thing. Paul Peters is claiming six figure profits per year. He is talking about guaranteeing winning bets. Even going as far as to say that if you like betting because it’s exciting, then The Sequence Multiplier won’t be for you because you’ll win so much it becomes boring.

Now, I will admit that ultimately, I am hugely cynical about all of this. And with good reason. But the truth of the matter is that if we can see just 5% of the claimed results delivered, you would still be pulling in a very decent second income. So, let’s delve in and see whether or not Paul Peters can deliver with The Sequence Multiplier.  

What Does The Sequence Multiplier Offer?

In terms of what you are actually getting, The Sequence Multiplier is somewhat unique when compared to the kind of products that you usually see from this kind of thing. Instead of a questionable tipster service, you are getting access to a questionable piece of software that supposedly, will allow you to find winning bets.

I know I’m being a little facetious, but that is actually what you are getting with The Sequence Multiplier. It is a piece of software that Paul Peters says that he has developed. Now, I won’t dwell on it too much as I think that it is a stretch to call this a piece of software. The reality of what I have seen is that this is much more akin to a tipster service, and that is how I will be treating it.

In no small part this is down to the fact that I haven’t really seen anything from the software which suggests that it is really able to work as a piece of software. It is also telling that alongside this, Paul Peters provides his own daily selections as well as “expert analysis” in a member’s area.

So, with all of that confusion out of the way, what exactly are you getting here? I believe that the fairest answer to this is a very typical daily horse racing tipster service. The only real difference between The Sequence Multiplier and most of the things that I look at on a day to day basis is the logistics of the operation.

Instead of sending out selections via email etc. there is that rather convoluted set up which is based around this idea of you getting software. Frankly, it overcomplicates something that doesn’t need to be, and it only makes a product that I am not really keen on, seem even worse.

In terms of the bets, everything that I have seen so far has been straight forward win bets. All of these have been middling odds and of a relatively low volume. There is nothing to suggest that The Sequence Multiplier is actually being operated by somebody who was genuinely in the positions that Paul Peters claims that he was (a point I will pick up a little later on).

Realistically, not a lot of this wouldn’t really be that disappointing (except the ridiculous claims of who Paul Peters is) if it weren’t for the fact that the tone that Paul Peters takes in his marketing of The Sequence Multiplier really set this up before you started. There isn’t anything wrong with products that don’t necessarily break the mould.

In fact, I have recently looked at a half decent tipster service that did exactly that. It is just that Paul Peters seems to play it safe for the sake of maximum customer retention for a certain period of time (those of you who have read my articles before can probably see what is coming here). I don’t believe that this is a coincidence.

With that out of the way, I want to talk a little bit about the staking plan that is in place, or more specifically, the lack thereof. Paul Peters doesn’t actually provide any information in terms of what you should betting if you are following The Sequence Multiplier. This is particularly problematic as all of the results are in pounds and pence, and as such, lack context.

For what it is worth, if I were following The Sequence Multiplier, I would personally be looking at the standard terms of a 1 point level staking system with a 100 point bank. This should give you more than enough coverage for when you inevitably don’t reach the lofty win rate that is insinuated.

Talking of which, whilst Paul Peters doesn’t actually ever make any specific claims in terms of the strike rate for The Sequence Multiplier, there is still a lot implied. We are, for example, told that you’ll be “WINNING EVERY TIME! Yup, that’s right. You’ll be winning EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.”.

So, there you are, straight away that suggests that there is in fact a 100% strike rate for The Sequence Multiplier (which categorically isn’t true). A so called testimonial also states “Everytime I bet on your tips THEY WIN time and time again”.  

It is also worth noting that The Sequence Multiplier comes with a large number of different bonus products, all of which are effectively tied into the core premise of getting “software”. From what I have seen of this, very little of this looks like it is really of any value.

How Does The Sequence Multiplier Work?

At the core of The Sequence Multiplier, is Paul Peters. He says that he was once the Director of Trading for one of Europe’s biggest bookmakers. Of course, this is entirely unsubstantiated and comes with no evidence whatsoever to back these claims up. I am not even slightly convinced by any of these claims at all.

Almost everything else is tied to this premise. The fact of the matter is that there isn’t really a lot that has been said outside of this. In fact, I would go as far as to say that most of the premise is built on the notion that because of his claimed previous position, he has a lot of knowledge and understanding that is beyond that of most bettors.

Outside of this, there is a lot of talk about how every other service that you will see is fraudulent or a con. Instead, Paul Peters says very explicitly that you can 100% trust him (a hallmark of trustworthiness). That “we’ve” been lied to time and time again, and that ultimately, “The Bullshit Ends Right Now”.

What is the Initial Investment?

If you want to sign up to The Sequence Multiplier, there is unfortunately only one option that is available, and it is a bit of a commitment really. Paul Peters is asking a one time payment of £39 plus VAT in order to receive a lifetime subscription to the service.

It is worth noting the fact that there is a full 60 day money back guarantee in place for the service. This is backed up by the fact that The Sequence Multiplier is being sold through Clickbank who typically offer this on all of their products. In one of the few things that I can credit Paul Peters with, this fact is very clearly mentioned on the sales page.

What is the Rate of Return?

Now we come to the part of The Sequence Multiplier that really sells the service. At least, I figure it’s supposed to. If I’m honest, it just set a lot of alarm bells ringing for me personally. Anyway, Paul Peters says that he makes a whopping £250,000 per year through his betting, and by signing up, you can do the same.

This is backed up by a very questionable screenshot of an HSBC bank account which has £259,126.90 in it. I should note that there are a lot of problems with this that I recognise (in no small part down to banking with them myself). There is also another dubious picture of a betting account with £17,210.90 in it.

There are also a number of those “testimonials” I mentioned earlier (I am very doubtful of their authenticity) which make claims of making anywhere from £12,000 in 2 weeks to £124,237.88 in 6 months. These are entirely without anything to support the claims.  

Conclusion for The Sequence Multiplier

I don’t really know where to start with The Sequence Multiplier, and I don’t mean that in a good way. There are a lot of problems here, but I think that ultimately, it boils down to the fact that Paul Peters makes so many claims, none of which are actually backed up by anything tangential.

This starts with how the service supposedly works. Simply put, I don’t believe that Paul Peters held the position that he claims to have held. Now, I can appreciate that this is a difficult thing to provide evidence for. But I have seen other tipsters who have made similar claims, but have been able to talk about their experience enough to convince me.

In the case of The Sequence Multiplier, we are basically told that it’s true, honestly, and cost it’s true, you should be fine following Paul Peters’s advice. This is an appropriate point to highlight as the tone of the sales material really leans into this idea that you can trust him. And honestly, anybody who goes out of their way that much to tell you that they’re trustworthy probably isn’t.

All of this lack of evidence isn’t just confined to how Paul Peters claims that he’s positioned to find selections. Honestly, there isn’t anything that I believe to be real that actually backs up a single element of The Sequence Multiplier, from the testimonials to the claimed income.

Now, this isn’t just idle superstition and speculation. The fact of the matter is that the vendor who is ultimately selling The Sequence Multiplier through Clickbank is one that is known to me. Unfortunately, this isn’t for reasons that are positive.  

In fact, they have put out a pretty substantial run of tipster services, not one of which I believe has mad anything close to the claimed results. Of course, The Sequence Multiplier hasn’t really done anything at all to suggest that it will be any different.

So, it will come as no real surprise to learn that I don’t really recommend The Sequence Multiplier at all. The whole thing comes with no evidence to back the claims made up. And honestly, they just aren’t realistic. £250,000 could mean anything really, however a lack of context and proofing suggests that ultimately, it doesn’t mean anything.  

Most of the time, I try to find something that is worthwhile about a tipster service. There aren’t any features that I consider to be redeeming, and as such, this just isn’t worth the small amount that Paul Peters is asking for his selections.

 

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From: Simon Roberts